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Understanding Cloud Provider Footprints is Vital to Identifying the Right Hybrid IT Infrastructure for Your Business

SANTA CLARA, Calif.July 19, 2017 /PRNewswire/ — Decisions on private and public cloud should not be limited just to the deployment models but focus on desired end-customer outcomes. Proper discovery must take place before any initiatives begin; without discovery, organizations risk missing their goals entirely.

Frost & Sullivan’s latest article, Getting the Right Mix for Your Hybrid IT Infrastructure, identifies which deployment models are best suited to specific workloads. In addition, the article reveals how organizations have navigated the choppy waters of geopolitics, regulation and security, as well as the biggest challenges and setbacks in multi-cloud environments.

Understanding cloud provider footprints is a challenge for many cloud practitioners. In some cases, it may be understood where data centers are situated and data resides, whereas the geographies through which data transitions can be a major issue. The issue is not limited to data itself. Data can reside in one location, but the logs or transition logs can be at multiple different levels.

“Organizations need to find the most appropriate places for data to reside; they need to understand linkages between the applications they consider migrating and the requirements of each application,” stated Frost & Sullivan Digital Transformation Principal Consultant Jarad Carleton. “The propensity to migrate to the public cloud will also depend on company size and type of workload. Many small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) feel the public cloud is the only real option available for reasons of cost and in-house enterprise.”

Almost all companies would deploy CRM applications in the public cloud, due to interfacing systems already relying on the public cloud. The location of clients and operations is closely linked to regulation, and many companies are challenged by different restrictions and acceptance of cloud in different countries.

Some technology decision-makers do not always adequately consider performance criteria linked to a view of how to secure the cloud engine. That will largely determine the workloads that can be migrated. Workloads that cannot be moved should not necessarily be left unchanged, and organizations should consider what could be done with them alternately.

Organizations must be clear on what they want to achieve from their partnerships, but they must be able to trust the partners to supply the correct approach. Companies must avoid the common mistake of rushing and defining dates for workload migration before the approach is even clear.

“Infrastructure, services, and partnerships are all important to the cloud journey of an organization. However, in relation to hybrid cloud strategy fulfillment, partnerships are key,” emphasizes Carleton. “There is less upfront visibility of the service that will be delivered in the end and organizations must put a lot of due diligence into the partners they pick, and how much confidence they can have in those partners.”

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SOURCE Frost & Sullivan

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